1950: Brockhouse is the president, but Indian’s headed for the outhouse

 This Brockhouse-era Indian-Vincent looks to be a pretty much straight-up Vincent with a U.S. style handlebar, but they also at least flirted with the idea of fitting a Vincent motor in a Chief frame – something a few custom builders tried on their own, later on.

This Brockhouse-era Indian-Vincent looks to be a pretty much straight-up Vincent with a U.S. style handlebar, but they also at least flirted with the idea of fitting a Vincent motor in a Chief frame – something a few custom builders tried on their own, later on.

John Brockhouse was a third-generation industrialist from England. He was involved in a tantalizing might-have-been project involving a Vincent Rapide-Indian Chief hybrid, but all he really wanted to do was use Indian’s U.S. distribution network as a way to sell Norton, AJS, and Royal Enfield motorcycles in the U.S.

In 1953, Indian ceased U.S. production. But Brockhouse Engineering acquired the trademark and sold rebadged Royal Enfield models as Indians until 1960. After that the trademark was briefly owned by Associated Motorcycles (AMC) which made Nortons. AMC sold the name, in turn, to Joseph Berliner.

 Brockhouse did, however briefly, get access to Indian's dealer network.

Brockhouse did, however briefly, get access to Indian's dealer network.